Sevilla.

Plaza de Toros

Silvina and I took a tour of the plaza de toros in Sevilla which included a visit to the museum and gallery that are located under the seats, as well the capilla (chapel) where the matadores go to pray before entering. Did you know that they have their own “hospital” on-site? I didn’t, but it certainly makes sense. Nor did I know that the corrida de toros had its origins in the Middle Ages, or that one of their suits can weigh more than thirty pounds (15kg)! The tour guide was incredibly informative, eloquent, and friendly. The museum, while appealing to my interests in history and art, ultimately made my stomach turn. When I see depictions of the bull with banderillas (smaller, hand-held spears) sticking out of its body, or the horse lying wounded on the ground in front of the bull, the first thing I see is unnecessary slaughter and pain for entertainment. This was really the only way I could enter the plaza de toros . . . empty.

    

Museo de Bellas Artes

There was a gem of a museum located two blocks away from our hostel, brimming with the works of Francisco de Zurbarán, Juan de Mesa, Gonzalo Bilbao, and the famous portrait of Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer. With an entrance fee of €1.50, it’s a steal! You also get the added benefit of enjoying the ambience and architecture of the seventeenth-century church that forms the majority of the museum’s galleries and patios.

Alcázar de los reyes (above)

This is phenomenal. If the Alhambra inspired M.C. Escher, I wonder what might have become of him had he visited Seville!? The interlaced geometric patterns that nearly cover the surface of this Mudejar fortress are so intricate. Some of them are carved, some are fitted tiles, and others are painted. The Arabic word for God — Allah — is scrolled along the walls, doors, and ceilings.

  

The transformations that were made by the Catholic Kings are visible in the images of animals and the official emblems of the medieval kingdoms, Aragón y Castilla, which were united upon their marriage. The gardens are extensive, although I was surprised to hear that they were significantly expanded in the 1950s. Underneath one of the main patios exists a series of baths, which were supposedly created by King Pedro I at the behest of his mistress, María de Padillas. Hence, the name Los Baños de Doña María de Padillas, (pictured below).

 

 

La Plaza de España

“A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away…” Luke Skywalker and Princess Leah walked along this plaza in  Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones. (Here’s a link with Spanish dubbing, if you’d like.) For each province in the country, there is a small alcove tiled with a pastoral scene and a map. I was more interested in watching other people interact — perhaps that’s a bit creepy — and the late afternoon sun playing on the buildings.

  

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1 comment
  1. mom said:

    WHAT AN AMAZING PLACE!!! YOU PROSE TOOK ME THERE AND HELD ME (OF COURSE, I WISH ATONIO BANDERAS WAS HOLDING ME!) BUT I LOVE ALL OF THIS TRIP. SURE MISS YOU AND LOOK FORWARD TO MORE TRAVEL SHOTS AND WORDS BY YOU. YOU ARE THE GREATEST.

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